Troy Tulowitzki announces retirement

Yankees shortstop Troy Tulowitzki announced his retirement from baseball, MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand reports. In a statement, Tulowitzki said:

I wanted to take this opportunity to announce my retirement as a Major League Baseball player.

For as long as I can remember, my dream was to compete at the highest level as a Major League Baseball Player … to wear a big league uniform and play hard for my teammates and the fans. I will forever be grateful for every day that I’ve had to live out my dream. It has been an absolute honor.

I will always look back with tremendous gratitude for having the privilege of playing as long as I did. There is no way to truly express my gratitude to the fans of Colorado, Toronto, and New York. They always made my family and I feel so welcome.

While this chapter is now over, I look forward to continuing my involvement in the game that I love … instructing and helping young players to achieve their goals and dreams.

I’m saying goodbye to Major League Baseball, but I will never say goodbye 2 the game I love. Thanks again 2 all of you!”

Tulowitzki used the number 2 in his closing line to reference the uniform number he wore with the Rockies and Blue Jays. He was under contract through 2020 as part of a 10-year, $157.75 million contract extension signed with the Rockies in November 2010. The Blue Jays released him in December with $38 million remaining. The Yankees signed him in January, obligated only to pay him the major league minimum salary of $555,000. Tulowitzki went on the injured list in early April due to a calf injury but he suffered a setback while rehabbing and couldn’t get healthy enough to return.

Across 14 years in the majors with the Rockies, Blue Jays, and Yankees, Tulowitzki hit .290/.361/.495 with 225 home runs and 780 runs batted in. Injuries plagued him throughout his career, as he played in 135-plus games in a season just three times. When he was healthy, he was a dynamic player who was one of the best hitters at his position as well as one of the top defenders. Tulowitzki was a five-time All-Star and twice won both the Gold Glove Award and the Silver Slugger Award. One wonders what he might have accomplished if his health cooperated.